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Sing for clean water

On September 30th, at 8 pm., in Berlin’s historic Gedächtniskirche,
the acclaimed Jocelyn B. Smith and the Choir of Redemption and other musical groups  will sing “Black Tide”.
The song born from South Sudan’s struggle to free itself from the ‘black tide’ of oil pollution
– 
the song which is becoming the anthem for clean water and for a healthful environment and a socially-just world.

Come join us at the Gedächtniskirche Berlin on September 30th!

Sing with us for the right to clean water in South Sudan, in Africa and in the world.

Sing with us an end to oil companies’ poisoning of our water, our politics and our lives.

Sing with us for a world in which resources are justly shared, and in which all have the same opportunities.

To sing with us, to get more information contact:
Terry Swartzberg
(+49-170) 473 35 72
blacktideberlin@hoffnungszeichen.de 

Veranstalter: Hoffnungszeichen Sign of Hope e.V.

On Black Tide

“Black Tide” emerged from the people of South Sudan’s struggle to save themselves from the black tide of oil pollution engulfing their land. The video of the song, which was composed by Sebastian Oswald (lyrics: Terry Swartzberg), was created by Anataban. ‘Anataban’ means “I am sicked and tired” in Arabic, and that is precisely what this collective of South Sudanese artists is: sick and tired of the war, rape, fight and hunger roiling their country. All of these problems stem from South Sudan’s having vast deposits of oil. The pumping of oil has bred pollution, corruption, extermination and repression of levels matched by few countries in the world. The video can be watched on the platform YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZM5Z3xuDek4

On Jocelyn B. Smith

Born in New York and based in Berlin, Jocelyn is one of Europe’s leading jazz and soul singers. She has issued more than a dozen albums and given well over 3,000 concerts, upon which praise and honors have been heaped. Also the objects of praise: Jocelyn’s commitments to social justice, spirituality, freedom and power of artistic expression, refugee rights and other causes. More information about Jocelyn B. Smith can be found on her website: www.jocelynbsmith.com

On Hoffnungszeichen | Sign of Hope e.V.

Based in Konstanz, Germany, Sign of Hope is an interdenominational human rights and aid organization. Since its founding in 1983, Sign of Hope has been providing disaster relief, emergency assistance and other forms of humanitarian aid. The organization also works to foster development and protect human rights. Its focus is on central East Africa. In 2008, due to the clinics that the organization maintains in South Sudan, Sign of Hope became aware of one of the world’s great human rights and environment scandals: the poisoning of the country’s groundwater by oil corporations – and of the attendant horrific consequences for South Sudan’s people.
More information about Sign of Hope: www.hoffnungszeichen.de

On Terry Swartzberg

Born in New York and based in Munich, Terry is an ethical campaigner whose causes are the commemoration of the victims of the Holocaust (via the Stolpersteine), the campaign for clean water in Africa (with Sign of Hope), the protection of the environment (for the United Nations) and green finance (for ver.de). www.swartzberg.com

On the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gedächtnis-Kirche

This church is one of the landmarks of today's Berlin. Located in the heart of the city, the church is characterized by its tower, which was destroyed in World War II – and left in its ruined state. It stands for the need for peace and reconciliation in our world, and for the remembrance of the horrors perpetrated in the war that was started by Germany. The church's interior is bathed in the blue light emanating from the glass walls that were created by German and French artists and crafts people. This uniquely spiritual atmosphere is complemented by the wall-side figure of Jesus Christ, who is spreading his arms to cast a blessing upon a troubled world. The church is thus the fitting venue for the “Black Tide”, which will be sung for clean water in South Sudan and around the world. This singing will launch a month at the church of exhibitions and other activities on precisely this pressing need.

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